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DubScript Screenplay Writer for Android™


Get it on Google Play

"...great for beginning screenwriters... full-featured [and] good-looking..."
--New York Times

Designed specifically for writers of film, TV, and online shorts, DubScript is an industry-strength, open-standard screenplay editor.

DubScript reads Final Draft (.fdx) and plain text Fountain screenplays and outputs to PDF and Final Draft (.fdx).

Now works on Android-enabled Chromebooks!

The complete package

  • Open text format compatible with other apps and editors.
  • Keep files on your own device, cloud storage (Google Drive, Box, etc.), or share with others.
  • Read Final Draft (.FDX) and Fountain. Output to PDF, .FDX, HTML, or cloud printers
  • New! Over EIGHT HUNDRED fonts to suit every writing mood and genre. Print/PDF is industry standard 12 pt Courier Prime.
  • Add a title page, dual-dialogue, and bold, underline, & italic.
  • Characters/scene heading auto-suggestion, undo/redo, find/replace, copy/paste, spell-check, auto-complete, keyboard shortcuts, scene numbering, notes, and more.
  • Night "white on black" mode
  • US Letter + A4 paper
  • Local rescue backups
  • Compare drafts
  • Hear your script read out loud
  • Statistics, reports, scene and character reports
  • New! Chromebook multi-window & Android 8+ support

Click here for more details.

New Beta Development Release

Like to write at the cutting edge? If you've subscribed to the beta releases in the Play store, a new version was just released. Now targeting the upcoming Android "P", the latest development version of DubScript takes a big leap forward with the newest "AndroidX Jetpack" libraries along with better Chrome OS Chromebook support and improved backward-compatibility. It also includes minor UI changes you probably won't notice.

The evidence is in: Use TWO spaces after a period in monospace screenplay fonts such as Courier Prime!

There's a "common knowledge" floating around that one can deduce the approximate generation of a screenwriter based on whether they use one or two spaces after a period: Older writers who learned to type on manual typewriters usually add two spaces, and younger writers who learned on a word processors with proportional fonts use only one space and let the software manage the spacing width.

This week the Washington Post had an article discussing the classic, controversial 1-vs-2 spaces controversy. Suprisingly (at least to me), of 60 college students recruited for the study, 21 were "two-spacers". But there's more. From the article:

The researchers then clamped each student's head into place, and used an Eyelink 1000 to record where they looked as they silently read 20 paragraphs. The paragraphs were written in various styles: one-spaced, two-spaced, and strange combinations like two spaces after commas, but only one after periods. And vice versa, too.

And the verdict was: two spaces after the period is better.